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February is Ovarian Cancer Awareness  

February 13th, 2018

Better Treatments For Ovarian Cancer


Recent articles published:

Ramping up the fight against ovarian cancer

Changing how ovarian cancer is treated in NSW

Can our genes help predict how women respond to ovarian cancer treatment?


In Australia, four women are diagnosed with ovarian cancer every day. Ovarian Cancer is the 6th most common cause of cancer death affecting women in Australia, with over 1, 000 deaths annually caused by this disease.

Professor Anna DeFazio leads the Gynaecological Oncology Research Laboratory at the Centre for Cancer Research, The Westmead Institute for Medical Research (WIMR). She also holds the Sydney-West Chair in Translational Cancer Research, University of Sydney, at Westmead Hospital.

Ovarian Cancer Cells
Ovarian Cancer Cells (from WIMR)

Ovarian cancer has been treated as a single disease but researchers are now beginning to understand that it is in fact made up of distinct subtypes and that the chemotherapy that works best for one subtype may not be the best choice for all.

Thanks to the generosity of our donors, Professor’s deFazio’s team at The Westmead Institute for Medical Research are working to give hope to women to look forward to longer and healthier lives.

After a long time where we had nothing better to offer women with ovarian cancer, things are changing quickly. We now have the tools to look at ovarian cancer very differently, and what we’re seeing could transform treatment,” said Professor deFazio.

Our researchers are looking at tumour mutations and genes on a molecular level discovering that each cancer has its own unique characteristics. The trick will be to find the treatment that works best for each type of ovarian cancer, and sometimes it might be a drug not usually used for ovarian cancer patients.

We already have patients diagnosed with resistant ovarian cancer, who have no further treatment options after failing chemotherapy treatment, treated with effective new drugs used for melanoma – as these ovarian cancers had the same mutation in a gene that frequently occurs in melanoma – and the tumours have slowly melted away.

This is not the cure for all ovarian cancer. The drugs worked well on these patients but it might not work for others. However, this outcome demonstrates a promising mechanism, that is, if we can match the right treatment with the right patient, we may be able to improve treatment outcome –to do this, the researchers at the Westmead Institute have joined with their colleagues across NSW to implement a program called INOVATe – Individualised ovarian cancer treatment through integration of genomic pathology into multidisciplinary care, funded by the Cancer Institute NSW.

Women diagnosed with ovarian cancer are invited to join the INOVATe study. After testing their tumour samples, the information will be added to the INOVATe data portal along with information from 2000 ovarian cancer patients. Currently a research tool, this portal in the future could be used by clinicians so they can see how their patients fit into the broader ovarian cancer picture and hopefully be able to select the most promising drug trials for each patient.

Read more:

Ramping up the fight against ovarian cancer

Changing how ovarian cancer is treated in NSW

Can our genes help predict how women respond to ovarian cancer treatment?

Giving hope: Ovarian Cancer

Gynaecological Oncology Research Group

INOVATe

If you would like to support the amazing researches being conducted here at Westmead, please donate by clicking the WMRF Heart

Follow us on       and let’s get connected! WMRF Heart

 

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SMART EATING WEEK | 12-18 February 2018

February 12th, 2018

It is Australia’s first SMART EATING WEEK this week so how are you going to participate? As it is the start of the New Year, it is a great time to review what you are doing and set new plans. Diet and exercise are the keys to longevity.

 

So in celebration of SMART EATING week here are some suggestions:

  1. Review the food you eat.
    Please use one of these links to assess your diet – either the CSIRO diet score or the Healthy Nutrition Quiz from the University of Newcastle or do both!
  2. Compare your score and then the dietary advice that is sent to you via the websites in response to you submitting your answers to the questionnaires.
  3. Plan to do 1 change every two weeks.
  4. Worryingly, the Fruit, Vegetables and Diet Score Report released by the CSIRIO, found one in two (51 per cent) adults are not eating the recommended intake of fruit, while two out of three adults (66 per cent) are not eating enough vegetables. So I expect one of the changes you may need to make will be to increase your fruit and vegetable intake. In this exercise I suggest you eat a rainbow- i.e. every day eat all the colours of the rainbow in fruit and vegetables(- see links and attachments) remember to eat at least 2 fruit and 5 vegetables a day!Eat-a-rainbow-fact-sheet

    Rainbow Colours of Fruit & Vegetables and their health benefits
     

    Go-for-2-fruit-and-5-veg

  5. Finally review some good cookbooks or links to websites to get some healthy delicious recipes, for example:Some of our Favourites (pdf)
    Livelighter Salad Builder (pdf)
    Recipes | The Heart Foundation
    Diabetes Australia
    CSIRO Total Wellbeing Diet
    Food As Medicine | Cooking for your best health
    More on Smart Eating Week at: Dietitians Association of Australia
  6. Finally – MOVE!
    Are you doing 30 minutes per day of activity?
    If not, find the time to do something – walk, swim, ride a bike , gym, tennis, yoga, pilates, tai chi, therabands, aqua-aerobics, etc.
    Enjoy the daylight savings’ afternoon sun!
  7. If you would like more advice on your particular food intake and how to improve your diet, make an appointment with your local Accredited Practicing Dietitian (APD) – look up the Dietitians Association of Australia Website and find your local APD.

 

“I hope this gives you some ideas to enjoy SMART EATING WEEK!”
Cheers,
Peter Talbot, APD, Dept Head, Dietetics and Nutrition, Westmead Hospital

 

For more information about supporting WMRF and hosting a fundraising event, please contact us on 1800 639 037 or via email

     WMRF Heart

0 Comments So Far, Posted In: Australia, Australian Healthy Weight Week, Brain, Community, Diabetes, Diet, Donate, Donations, Eat a rainbow, Fruits, Health, Healthy diet, Kids health, Meals, Mens Health, Nutrition, Research, RunRideWalk, Salads, Smart Eating, Treatment, Type 1, Vegetables, walk, Western Sydney, Westmead, WIMR, Women, Womens Health

Bullying: There's a lot we can do to stop it

February 2nd, 2018

In light of the increasing cyber bullying, youth suicides and mental health issues, here in Western Sydney, there are many accessible services available for kids/teenagers and for parents to access resources.

Please follow the link to view downloadable resources and please share with your children, groups, and community.

Thanks to Redbank House, Westmead for providing these vital resources we are sharing with you.

If you or anyone else are in an emergency, or at immediate risk of harm to yourself or others, please contact emergency services on 000.

Other phone services:
Lifeline 13 11 14
Beyond Blue Support Service 1300 22 46 36

 

    WMRF Heart

0 Comments So Far, Posted In: #stopbullyingnow, Adolescent Health, Bullying, Cyber bullying, Family, Mental Health, Parents, Resources, Stop Bullying, Support, Treatment, Western Sydney, Westmead, Youth Health

Building Healthy Habits When Life Is Busy: Tips For Lasting Success

January 3rd, 2018



[Image via
Pixabay]

A word from Lindsay M from Public Health Corps

Developing and sticking with healthy habits can be a challenge for many given how busy people’s lives are today. Things get hectic with work, family commitments, and other relationships, and as a result, one’s health often becomes a low priority. Sometimes life makes getting healthy all the more difficult, but there are small steps you can take to achieve a healthy lifestyle.

Focus on one healthy habit at a time

The Washington Post points out that it is common for people to try to change too many things at once when they are aiming to create new healthy habits. You may decide that you need to cut out junk food, start exercising five times a week, and eliminate tobacco and alcohol from your life, but you may be setting yourself up for failure if you don’t slow down and form a plan.

When you aim to incorporate healthy habits into your life, you have to figure out what you are eliminating as well. For example, if you determine that you want to exercise five days a week, you have to figure out where in your busy day you can dedicate the time to that. Most people have work and family commitments that limit their free time, so it may work best to be specific about the habit you want to incorporate and form a plan for how to tackle it.

Develop a plan and make yourself a priority

In today’s busy world, many people have gotten used to expecting quick results and when it comes to developing healthy habits, progress can be slow. Psychology Today suggests writing down your plan of attack, detailing the benefits that will come from succeeding, and setting a date for beginning. This approach can work on any number of goals, and people do tend to achieve better results when they are detailed about the steps they will follow to be successful.

Sticking with healthy habits can be challenging under the best of circumstances, so it is important that you make sure you are giving yourself every opportunity to succeed by making yourself a priority. Self-care is critical, but it can be hard to find time for it when you are so busy. Start by creating some non-negotiable rituals such as turning your phone off every night by 8:00 p.m., starting each morning with a short yoga session, or creating a planning sheet before diving into work or the day’s chores. Before you know it, the rituals will become a habit and you can slowly add on.

Switch it up and try something new

It can be hard to break out of our comfort zones, but there are actually many benefits to it. For starters, by challenging yourself to do things you typically wouldn’t do, you experience uncertainty in a controlled environment. In doing so, you can prepare yourself for life changes that force you out of your comfort zone, and be apt to try out healthy habits the old you would have never dreamed of trying. In addition, productive discomfort transforms your comfort zone, making activities or situations that were once difficult or stressful easier to do.

 

Breaking out of your comfort zone doesn’t have be stressful, in fact, it can be extremely relaxing and help you take charge of whatever is holding you back. The Big Om Yoga Retreat connects yogis of all experience levels for a weekend of community yoga, workshops, and connection with a relaxed schedule to allow for a variety of experiences. In addition, yoga is one of the many healthy ways to replace a bad habit with a good one while gaining perspective to enable you to grow and learn.

Practicing self-care will help you be stronger for your loved ones

It is easy to lose yourself when your focus is on the people around you such as a partner, family, extended family, or co-workers. You are stuck in a cycle of feeling good when you help others but having to suffer silently through your own issues. Sadly, self-care typically falls by the wayside, but it’s time to bring it to the forefront. Self-care involves taking your fulfilment into your own hands to ensure that your emotional needs are being met. While it may feel selfish or difficult to focus on your own health, ignoring those needs can lead to bigger issues.

 

The good news is that self-care can start in the comfort of your own home. No time to go to the gym? Set up your own home gym using minimal equipment (here are some great ideas on getting started) and focus your efforts on effective strength training exercises like push ups (learn how to fix your form here), planks, wall sits and squats. Get light cardio by playing your favorite music and dancing until dinner is ready or chasing the kids around the house. Need some quiet time? Set aside a room or corner in your home that is your own personal retreat where you can escape for moments at a time to take a breather, gather your thoughts, and relax. Take time for a 30 second check in a few times a day to discover what is truly going on inside of you so you can create a plan to address it. Start making a habit of putting yourself first so you can be the best you for your loved ones.

Building healthy habits can be difficult given issues with work, relationships, and family that typically take center stage. However, pinpointing healthy habits to incorporate and building a plan to achieve them can help give you strength to keep up with all of the demands on your time.

 

    WMRF Heart

Related links: 

World Diabetes Day – 14 November

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The faces behind our incredibly generous fundraisers – The Doig Family

December 13th, 2017

 

“Funding from donors towards small things for the Palliative Care Unit is crucial;
like a new couch, a new paint job, nice curtains, things to improve the environment for families at such a really difficult time.
And so, it is not just about looking after the patients, it’s also about caring for the families to help them through this difficult journey.
It was just immeasurable the impact of what the Doig family, for example,
did for the staff. It actually leads to better patient care because the staff are just overwhelmed by that generosity and
gives them really good feedback about the job they’re doing, so in the long run patient care actually improves from the high levels that it’s at already,”
said Dr Philip Lee

 

Joe Conneely, Head of Development at WMRF, said that the fundraisers who attended the event are truly committed to the Foundation’s mission of supporting the delivery of medical research & patient care.

 

 

“Without the incredible generosity of fundraisers like the Doig family, we would be unable to achieve our results translated into support for a diverse range of Westmead Hospital areas and wards” he said.

 

WMRF Heart Thank you to the Doig family for all your support  WMRF Heart

 

For more information about supporting WMRF and hosting a fundraising event, please contact Marlene Nasr, Community Relations & Events Manager on 1800 639 037 or via email

     WMRF Heart

 

Related links:

WMRF says thank you to our fundraisers


WMRF says thank you to our fundraisers

 

0 Comments So Far, Posted In: Breast Cancer, Cancer, Cancer Treatment, Cancer Treatments, Community, Donate, Donations, Events, Fundraise, Gifts in kind, Health, Mens Health, Palliative Care, Research, Third party, Treatment, Western Sydney, Westmead, Westmead Hospital, Westmead Innovation District, WIMR, Womens Health

WMRF says thank you to our fundraisers

December 12th, 2017

n Wednesday 6 December 2017, a group of enthusiastic and generous fundraisers who have been supporting the work of Westmead Medical Research Foundation (WMRF) over the years, got together at Acacia House for a recognition event. They were welcomed by the Foundation’s staff to enjoy a special occasion that was about thanking them and giving them the opportunity to meet fellow fundraisers and donors.

Stories and videos about the impact of donors’ generosity were shared during an evening that was filled with emotive memories of those different fundraising initiatives and donations that have made a big difference to the lives of patients, medical staff and researchers.

Attendees of the event also included Dr Philip Lee, former Director of Supportive and Palliative Care Medicine at Westmead & 2017 Parramatta Citizen of the Year; Dr Sally Greenaway, Director of Supportive and Palliative Care Medicine at Westmead; Donna Garland, Operations Director of Women’s & Newborn Health at Westmead; John Whittaker, Nurse Manager of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at Westmead and Noeline Rozanc, Nurse Unit Manager at the Radiation Oncology at The Crown Princess Mary Cancer Centre (CPMCC).

 
From left to right:
John Whittaker (Nurse Manager of the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at Westmead); Dr Philip Lee, Noeline Rozanc (Nurse Unit Manager at the Radiation Oncology at CPMCC)

From left to right:
Lynette & Amelia for Run 4 Jess, Dr Sally Greenaway, Director of Supportive and Palliative Care Medicine at Westmead

From left to right:
WMRF Ambassador, Darren Kong; from the Lions Club of Holroyd, Peter & Bob; from the Merrylands Rugby Union Club Luke, (Noeline, CMPCC) & Laura


From left to right:
Shave For Silas, Kyrra & Larran; Haematology donation, Chris & Bella


Left to right: Annual Margi Doig Golf Day, Ben, Belinda (Ben’s wife) and Matt Doig


Ben & Matt Doig lost their mother Margie Doig who passed away at Westmead Hospital in Palliative Care & was cared for by Dr Lee, read more about Doig Family Annual Margi Golf Day

 

Joe Conneely, Head of Development at WMRF, said that the fundraisers who attended the event are truly committed to the Foundation’s mission of supporting the delivery of medical research & patient care.

“Without their incredible generosity, we would be unable to achieve our results translated into support for a diverse range of Westmead Hospital areas and wards such as NICU, Palliative Care, Women’s & Newborn Health, Neurosurgery, Haematology; along with funds for heart disease research carried on at The Westmead Institute,” he said.

WMRF The Dogao Family

On May 6, 2016, Noah was born at Norwest Private Hospital. Unfortunately he was not breathing when he came into the world and doctors worked for 3 hours to stabilise him.Noah was rushed to the Westmead Women's & Newborn Health Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Ward (NICU) at Westmead Hospital, where he spent the first 10 weeks his life before moving across to The Children's Hospital at Westmead.Noah was ultimately diagnosed with Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy. The Dogao Family took the opportunity following Noah's recovery and being home, to raise $13,666 to help refurbish the NICU Parents Room! The wonderful support allowed the room to be renovated. The clip shows Noah and his parents during the grand opening!Westmead Medical Research Foundation with Know My Health as Media Support Partners produced this short clip recently shown at a thank you event held by the Foundation.#CaptureEveryStory

Posted by Know My Health on Thursday, 7 December 2017

For more information about supporting Westmead Medical Research Foundation via hosting a fundraising event, please contact Marlene Nasr, Community Relations & Events Manager on 1800 639 037 or to find out how you can support, please go through our website.

    WMRF Heart


Related:

Dogao Family Video – Baby Noah

WMRF The Dogao Family

On May 6, 2016, Noah was born at Norwest Private Hospital. Unfortunately he was not breathing when he came into the world and doctors worked for 3 hours to stabilise him.Noah was rushed to the Westmead Women's & Newborn Health Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Ward (NICU) at Westmead Hospital, where he spent the first 10 weeks his life before moving across to The Children's Hospital at Westmead.Noah was ultimately diagnosed with Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy. The Dogao Family took the opportunity following Noah's recovery and being home, to raise $13,666 to help refurbish the NICU Parents Room! The wonderful support allowed the room to be renovated. The clip shows Noah and his parents during the grand opening!Westmead Medical Research Foundation with Know My Health as Media Support Partners produced this short clip recently shown at a thank you event held by the Foundation.#CaptureEveryStory

Posted by Know My Health on Thursday, 7 December 2017


DOIG FAMILY – Annual Margi Doig Golf Day

 

Ben and Matt lost their mother Margie Doig who passed away at Westmead Hospital in Palliative Care under the care of Dr Philip Lee. Watch their video below!

From 2007 – 2015 the family hosted a Golf Day fundraiser in memory of their mother on her birthday, June 10. They had a fantastic network of family and friends that supported their fundraising initiative and raised approximately $120,000 over the years which was directed to Palliative Care.


Run 4 Jess 
 


Steve Clark was married to Jess Clark who passed away in 2013 in C5C Oncology ward. Steve and his family wanted to honour Jess’ memory by creating an event that showcased what Jess loved doing – sports and exercise. They have held five consecutive ‘Run 4 Jess’ fundraisers and raised over $20,000 to go towards C5C Oncology.

Dr Lee attended the fundraiser in March 2017 and they have already booked their date for 2018.

Lynette Clark is Steve’s mother and is the one who organises the fundraiser and helps him. Lynette is a member of the running club and has links to the Girraween Athletics Club.


Shave for Silas – Kyrra Cross

 

Earlier this year, Kyrra and her family generously organised an online fundraiser “Shave 4 Silas.” Thorugh this initiative, and with the amazing support of Kyrra’s sister – Larran and Silas’ godfather, Mani, they raised over $11,000 and donated to WMRF to support the work of Dr Dexter and his Neurosurgery team at Westmead Hospital.

Shave For Silas


Merrylands Rugby Union Club

Wolves Win Game for Westmead’s Cancer Centre


Lions Club of Holroyd

How many sausages does it take to make a wheelchair? The answer is – a heck of a lot!


Chris & Bella Sarne

Remembering a lovely wife & mum through a generous gesture


Darren Kong

Darren fundraised through the Miss Australia Chinese Pageant with funds raised going to Westmead Institute for Medical Research (WIMR) towards Dr Chong’s work. Darren is now one of our WMRF Ambassadors.

Thank you Miss Australia Chinese Pageant 2017

    WMRF Heart

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Easy ride for Westmead Hospital patient and visitors, courtesy of two new buggies

December 1st, 2017

Westmead Hospital has upgraded its two patient and visitor transport buggies, courtesy of a generous donation from Arab Bank Australia, the George Naim Khattar Foundation and Holdmark Property Group.

The new buggies, which were co-sponsored by the organisations and donated courtesy of Westmead Medical Research Foundation (WMRF), replace the hospital’s well-loved “green machines” that have helped transport patients and visitors across its vast corridors for nearly a decade.

Operated by a group of friendly volunteer drivers, the buggies are available five days a week from the hospital’s main entrance to community members in need of mobility assistance.

The first buggy – dubbed the “green machine” for its bright-green paint job – was introduced in 2007, with support from Arab Bank Australia. But after nearly 10 years of constant use, the buggy fleet was in need of an upgrade.

Westmead Hospital acting general manager Sue-Anne Redmond, said the new buggies would be greatly appreciated by all users.

“It is a task getting around a big hospital like Westmead, and when you are unwell, it can feel almost impossible – that’s why the complimentary buggy system is so important,” she said.

 

“I know the hard-working volunteers who drive these buggies will greatly appreciate the new vehicles; it is thanks to them that patients and visitors with mobility difficulties can easily access the various wards, clinics and services within the hospital.”

Westmead Medical Research Foundation Head of Development Joe Conneely acknowledged the generosity of the organisations behind the new buggies.

“The dedication of these three organisations to help our community is sincerely appreciated,” he said. “Their support means we can continue to provide patients and visitors with this free service, which is part of our ongoing commitment towards our patients’ health and wellbeing.”

The buggy service was a finalist in the 2012 NSW Health Awards.

For more information on how your business can support WMRF, contact Joe Conneely on 1800 639 037 or email.

    WMRF Heart

Related links:

Western News (ISSU), 6th Dec 2017 – Easy ride for Westmead Hospital patient and visitors

Parramatta Sun, 4th Dec 2017 –  Westmead Hospital unveils patient and visitor transport buggies 

Zoom zoom: Easy ride for Westmead Hospital patient and visitors

0 Comments So Far, Posted In: Arab Bank Australia, Brain, Breast Cancer, Cancer, Cancer Treatments, Challenge, Community, Corporate, Corporate sponsors, Diabetes, Diet, Donate, Donations, Fundraise, Gifts in kind, Health, Mens Health, Newborn, Newborn Care, NICU, Sponsors, Third party, Transplant, Treatment, Western Sydney, Westmead, Westmead Innovation District, WIMR, Women, Womens Health

Remembering our loved ones

November 30th, 2017

 

The Westmead Memorial Service (Palliative Care, Oncology, Haematology and Renal & Supportive Care) was held this morning at the John Loewenthal Auditorium – Westmead Hospital.

This is a service of remembrance and thanksgiving that is held twice a year for family members and friends who have passed away at Westmead Hospital.

Families, friends and staff have the opportunity to remember loved ones during a service that offers readings, time for reflection, a candle lighting ceremony and songs of remembrance.


Light a Candle” –  Adapted from the poem by Paul Alexander
Performed by Ray Wilcox, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Palliative Care.

Nati Roses has been supporting the Westmead Memorial Services since it began in 2011 through their in-kind donation of beautiful roses to Westmead Medical Research Foundation (WMRF). Each family member or friend gets to take a rose in memory of their loved one. Thank you to the team at Nati for their generous and on-going support.

For further information on how you can support, please contact Alison Whittaker – 1800 639 037

    WMRF Heart

Bereavement counselling is available for family members, carers and friends of patients known to
Supportive & Palliative Care and related services who have died.

For more information or to make an appointment call (02) 9881 1723.

For other resources and information about grief and loss see Australian Centre for Grief and Bereavement.

    WMRF Heart

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